Tag Archives: 2/5

Three Romances I Wanted To Love But Didn’t

Sometimes, books just don’t work out for me. It’s not even that these books are bad, because they aren’t. They just each pushed some buttons and I didn’t enjoy them as much as I hoped I would. I decided to do shorter reviews for books that didn’t work for me from now on, since my posting schedule is different and I’d rather spend my time and effort talking at length about books that I actually loved.

Love Story (Love Unexpectedly #3) by Lauren Layne
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Links:

Source: Publisher via NetGalley. Thank you for providing me with an e-copy of this novel in exchange for an honest review.

Genre: contemporary NA romance.

My rating:

Love Story…Ahh, I wanted to love it so much. I read it at the end of a serious Lauren Layne binge (I discovered her last year and was then lucky enough to read this as an ARC, so I’m super late posting my review, oops), and maybe that’s why I wasn’t entirely impressed by it.

I mostly just couldn’t connect with the characters. Lucy was too “spoiled princess” for my taste, I didn’t really see what her conflict was here, and Reece was an asshole one too many times. I mean, the plot itself (a road trip across the US and a second chance romance) should have been enough for me to completely fall for it because those are some awesome tropes right there. And I did enjoy it, it was a quick read, I just wished to empathize more with Lucy and Reece.

It’s a standalone, even though it’s listed as a part of a series, which is kind of nice in the world of romance. If you’re already a Layne fan, go for it, you might connect better with the main characters. But if not, try another LL book first and fall in love with those (they’re great and she’s one of my favorite contemporary romance authors).

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Rescued by the Space Pirate (Ruby Robins Sexy Space Odyssey #1) by Nina Croft
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Links: Goodreads.

Source: Publisher via NetGalley. Thank you for providing me with an e-copy of this novel in exchange for an honest review.

Genre: space opera erotica.

My rating:

(Trigger warning for rape and dubious consent) Uhhh this book. I wanted this book to be campy and ridiculous and maybe sexy. I mean, when you pick up a book with such a title, you don’t expect to find serious literature of Nobel-prize-winning kind. But I expected some sort of space opera, with kissing. (Somebody find me that, please, I really want it now!)

What I got instead was alien porn with questionable consent and some uncool views on rape. *sad trombone* No but seriously, a hero who takes one look at a woman who was repeatedly gang-raped by weird tentacly aliens and says “she’ll get over it, people can adapt to anything” is not a hero I want to read about. Our heroine also gets bullied (aka fired from her job) into accepting the position of a spy which gets her into a situation where she gets touched by an alien against her will (she gets an orgasm out of it but it doesn’t change the fact that it’s non-consensual), so I wasn’t too impressed.

Look, I kind of wanted to continue reading the series because a three-way with a hot blue-skinned alien and a man who’s half-droid sounds like great fun (in writing, lol) but there were just too many issues for me to ignore. Now please, give me your space romance recs (aliens and tentacles are…fine, just as long as everyone’s there of their own free will).

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Royally Screwed (Royally #1) by Emma Chase
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Links:

Source: purchased for Kindle.

Genre: contemporary romance.

My rating:

Whyyyyy are allllll the heroes such assholesssss? Don’t get me wrong, I like a good bad boy now and then, but not if he’s a straight-up jackass. I’ve seen a lot of positive reviews for Emma Chase’s Royally series, and this was a fast read (what contemporary romance isn’t?), but I didn’t get the appeal of Prince Charming, so the whole thing fell short for me.

He behaved atrociously towards Olivia, insulted her and treated her like crap, AND YET she went with him and they somehow fell in love. Being fantastic in bed doesn’t make a hero a good person, and at the end of the day, I want my romance heroes to be good guys the heroine can trust to stand beside her no matter what. Prince Nicholas just didn’t deliver on that. Meh.

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Give me all your romance recs, especially the sci-fi kind if you have any. 

Any new contemporary romance authors I should try? I’ve been on a real contemporary kick lately.

I’d love to hear from you! :)

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The Wrath and the Dawn by Renee Ahdieh

The Wrath and the Dawn (The Wrath and the Dawn #1) by Renee Ahdieh
Published in 2015 by G.P. Putnam's Sons Books for Young Readers.

Links: Goodreads.

Source: purchased for Kindle.

Genre: YA fairytale retelling.

My rating:

In a land ruled by a murderous boy-king, each dawn brings heartache to a new family. Khalid, the eighteen-year-old Caliph of Khorasan, is a monster. Each night he takes a new bride only to have a silk cord wrapped around her throat come morning. When sixteen-year-old Shahrzad’s dearest friend falls victim to Khalid, Shahrzad vows vengeance and volunteers to be his next bride. Shahrzad is determined not only to stay alive, but to end the caliph’s reign of terror once and for all.

Night after night, Shahrzad beguiles Khalid, weaving stories that enchant, ensuring her survival, though she knows each dawn could be her last. But something she never expected begins to happen: Khalid is nothing like what she’d imagined him to be. This monster is a boy with a tormented heart. Incredibly, Shahrzad finds herself falling in love. How is this possible? It’s an unforgivable betrayal. Still, Shahrzad has come to understand all is not as it seems in this palace of marble and stone. She resolves to uncover whatever secrets lurk and, despite her love, be ready to take Khalid’s life as retribution for the many lives he’s stolen. Can their love survive this world of stories and secrets?

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Lovely people, please be aware that this review will contain SPOILERS (like major spoilers, not just tiny unimportant ones), so if you haven’t read this book, you should probably stay away. Just sayin’. I wanted to write a normal review but then I decided that I wanted to rant a bit and I can’t do that without discussing some plot points that happen later in the book. Also, if you’re feeling very protective about this novel, you should probably skip this as well. I won’t be posting this to any of the usual sites like Goodreads, I don’t want to spread misery around, but this is my place and I think I can safely express my opinion here.

This was actually the first book I read after my son was born earlier this month, so I was a hormonal mess at the time, which – if you think about it – should make me more lenient in my criticism. But I just didn’t like this story that much. I know I’m a black sheep in this case, the majority of the reviews I’ve seen around the blogosphere were very favourable, so I’m guessing I had the misfortune of encountering a huge number of my pet peeves in a single book. Eh.

I tend to dislike a novel when I dislike the characters. And I just didn’t connect with Shahrzad like I was supposed to. The girl was forever crumbling to the floor, worrying about her dresses and makeup while in mortal danger, and making silly decisions. Let me just ask you something: if you found out you had a latent magical ability, would you calmly go about your business like nothing had happened? NO. You’d demand someone teach you how to use it, for fuck’s sake. Ditto with the magic carpet. How can you own a flying carpet and not give it a spin? The fact that she volunteered to become Khalid’s next wife and went in with the half-assed plan of telling him a story and killing him without a weapon also made me roll my eyes. As did the teensy problem that she fell in love with her would-be killer (Stockholm Syndrome, anyone?). See, it pushes my buttons, this story.

Then there’s the love triangle. The boys of this story, the Caliph (= king) Khalid and Tariq, Shazi’s childhood fancy/fiancé, were… bland. I was rooting for Tariq up until the moment when he decided that Shazi certainly couldn’t know her own damn mind and decided to remove her from the palace against her will. Khalid was so unsure about his decision to keep her alive that she nearly got choked to death before he changed his mind yet again and beat the guard who was charged with killing her – even though the guy was just doing his job. *sigh* Add the sexy girl from Khalid’s past and a heavy dose of jealousy on Shazi’s part and you get a nice picture of the romantic situation in that palace. Ugh.

I didn’t even like the writing. I’m sure it’s accomplished and all but it just seemed like too much. Okay, so I enjoyed reading about the food, especially since I was eating hospital food at the time (as I said, this was just after my kid was born), but the flowery language just didn’t do it for me.

Nevertheless, I’m still debating reading the sequel. First of all, it’s a duology, so I’m in no danger of tackling a six-part series, which is good. I also want to see if Shazi will step up and own her power – she might redeem herself yet. I don’t know. I wanted to like this story so badly, it has everything I usually want in a book, but the execution was just not for me. I’m in no rush to go and buy The Rose and the Dagger but I might pick it up at some point.

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Have you read The Wrath and the Dawn? What did you think?

Will I have to defend myself against a hail of stones for my crappy review? 

I’d love to hear from you! :)

Let’s be friends: emailbloglovin’twitterinstagramgoodreads.

A Court of Mist and Fury by Sarah J. Maas

A Court of Mist and Fury (A Court of Thorns and Roses #2) by Sarah J. Maas
Published in May 2016 by Bloomsbury Children's Books.

Links: Goodreads.

Source: purchased (paperback).

Genre: New Adult High Fantasy.

My rating:

Feyre is immortal. After rescuing her lover Tamlin from a wicked Faerie Queen, she returns to the Spring Court possessing the powers of the High Fae. But Feyre cannot forget the terrible deeds she performed to save Tamlin’s people – nor the bargain she made with Rhysand, High Lord of the feared Night Court.

As Feyre is drawn ever deeper into Rhysand’s dark web of politics and passion, war is looming and an evil far greater than any queen threatens to destroy everything Feyre has fought for. She must confront her past, embrace her gifts and decide her fate. She must surrender her heart to heal a world torn in two.

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So. I might be a black sheep again with this one. This review will be FULL OF SPOILERS because it’s very hard to talk about most of what’s happened in the story without spoiling you for something since a pivotal event occurs at about 10% of the book. If you’d like to see a nonspoilery review of A Court of Thorns and Roses, the first book in the series, you can read it here.

I’m not even counting this one towards my Retelling Challenge because there’s no clear source of inspiration that I can see, unlike with the first book, which was loosely based on Beauty and the Beast and also Tam Lin.

Let’s do the positives first, shall we? This is a very fast read. It has more than 600 pages and yet I read it in 3 or 4 days despite my rather hectic schedule these days. Sarah J. Maas is the queen of bingeable books and I can see why they’re extremely popular. The story is quick and the writing good enough to pull you in.

And, uh, it’s… um… yeah. I have nothing more. *sigh*

What you have to know is that this is the second time I’ve been seriously disappointed with how Maas handled her relationships in her series. In my (spoilery!) review of Queen of Shadows, I complained about how she spent two books developing a relationship between two characters, only to drop it like a hot potato in favor of a new, shiny one. It ticked me off. Why did I bother getting invested in that couple when she was going to break them up anyway? So you can imagine my surprise when she did it again! Tamlin and Feyre are no more and now we have Rhys and Feyre to root for. Ugh.

This is not to say that I don’t prefer Feyre with Rhys. Because I do. I never particularly liked Tamlin but that doesn’t mean I wanted him to become this horrible creature that he is in this second book! Seriously, you guys, can anyone explain this shift to me? I complained about how Maas changed Chaol’s nature in Queen of Shadows but this change here was extreme. I know Tamlin was an overbearing ass from the start but he’s gone completely crazy here. Oh and Lucian? The one character I liked from A Court of Thorns and Roses? He’s a spineless worm, that’s what he is.

I also wanted to smack Feyre a couple of times. Look, I get it, she got through a horrible ordeal and is suffering from PTSD, but her actions – or rather non-actions – were painful to read about. Maas made her relationship with Tamlin seem abusive – and I’m not talking just about the part where he locked up like an animal, I’m talking about the sex where she feels nothing and yet allows Tamlin to come to her bed every night. This is a very problematic attitude, especially in a book that’s geared towards a young audience.

Which brings me to my next point. This is NOT a young adult book! I have no idea why the series was picked up by a children’s publisher because this clearly falls into new adult category. I’m not going to say it’s an adult fantasy because Feyre is too naive to exist as a proper adult character and some of the topics are simply too “young” to be counted as adult (am I even making sense right now?) but there is killing and sex and I can’t say I would like my 17-year-old future kid reading this stuff. I mean, people, you know I’m not a prude, but this wall-banging, body-licking, scream-inducing sex is hardly something that should be in books for teenagers – if nothing else, it sets up unrealistic expectations. :)

Okay, so I do like Rhys. I like how he is with Feyre, he doesn’t take her decisions away from her, he doesn’t speak for her and she’s a better person all around when she’s with him. So there you go, another positive thing I have to say about this book.

BUT PEOPLE, why does EVERYONE have to have a tragic story here? Like there’s Mor who was beaten (and probably raped) by her own family because she refused to be bartered off like a prize mare. There are Feyre’s sisters who get turned into Fae against their will (hello, have we learned nothing from the first book? Changing people without their consent is bad!). There are the two badass warriors (um, their names escape me) and each of them has gone through hell to become the great man that he is. Why can’t we have someone who is a good person despite having had a very nice childhood? I can assure you, it is possible to know about sacrifice and hardships without actually having been beaten half to death. Promise. It’s also possible to be a good lead character if you’re human! Imagine that.

And the similarities between her two series!! Gah! Both Celaena and Feyre are very beautiful and skinny and everyone loves them and wants to be with them. They make ancient, immortal males swoon and follow them around like puppies. Said males are protective and gruff but really have hearts of gold. Their crews of other badass males are all damaged and scary but they have their reasons for looking like they’re going to rip your throat out. Save me, please.

Yeah, if you’re still reading this, you deserve a hug. *hug* 

Anyway, I wasn’t even a fan of the ending. Nope. Feyre has gone to spy at Tamlin’s court and will basically sell her body for information if I understand things correctly. But you know, as long as she knows she really loves Rhys. Ugh. Ugh. Ugh.

So many things! But you know what? I’m almost a 100% sure I’ll be reading the sequel anyway because a) I want to finish the series and b) I want to see where she takes it. I just hope (I really hope) it will be a trilogy. If it gets stretched into a longer series, I might not bother after all.

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*long exhale*

So. Now it’s your turn. What did you think about this one?

Has a series (or an author) ever disappointed you like this?

I’d love to hear from you! :)

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Warrior Witch by Danielle L. Jensen

Warrior Witch (The Malediction Trilogy #3) by Danielle L. Jensen
Published on May 3rd, 2016 by Angry Robot.

Links: Goodreads.

Source: publisher via NetGalley. Thank you Angry Robot for providing me with an e-copy of this novel in exchange for an honest review.

Genre: YA fantasy.

My rating:

Cécile and Tristan have accomplished the impossible, but their greatest challenge remains: defeating the evil they have unleashed upon the world.

As they scramble for a way to protect the people of the Isle and liberate the trolls from their tyrant king, Cécile and Tristan must battle those who’d see them dead. To win, they will risk everything. And everyone.

But it might not be enough. Both Cécile and Tristan have debts, and they will be forced to pay them at a cost far greater than they had ever imagined.

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This is the review for the final instalment of The Malediction Trilogy. I really liked the first part, though I never reviewed it, but I do have the review for Hidden Huntress if you want to check it out. Hint: I wasn’t too impressed by it. This post is divided into two parts: the first probably contains spoilers for Stolen Songbird and Hidden Huntress but not for Warrior Witch, while the second is absolutely full of them because I want to rant a bit. So stop reading at the “spoilers ahoy” mark if you don’t wish to know… pretty much everything there is to know about this book.

The non-spoilery part

Warrior Witch wasn’t a particularly satisfying conclusion to the trilogy. As I said, Hidden Huntress left a lot to be desired, mainly because it suffered from second book syndrome. But this one just exploded right there in my face and took no prisoners. 

I thought the first third of the novel was a bit slow. It featured a lot of anxiety between Tristan and Cécile, their bond was tested and whatnot. I also thought some of the decisions they made were spectacularly bad, but who am I to judge? Cécile is seventeen, after all, and not a war general but a farm-girl-turned-opera-singer-turned-troll-princess. Tristan should have known better, though, he’s spent his life preparing just for this moment. I felt like their chemistry was flat, too, despite the fact that their relationship progressed in some ways.

I was also still having trouble with reconciling “trolls” with the humanoid, rather handsome individuals who populated this book. For me, trolls are like those creatures from The Hobbit, all grey and stupid and huge – not sexy. 

The focus on the intrigue was too heavy for my taste, I had trouble keeping track of all the players and their numerous, convoluted schemes, especially since I didn’t remember Hidden Huntress well enough. Maybe a bit of repetition at the beginning of the book wouldn’t have gone amiss – I felt like I should have re-read the first two parts prior to starting this one, but I just wasn’t invested enough. *sigh*

I was honestly surprised by the body count of this novel! I know war takes its toll but here it just seemed so senseless (not that war makes a lot of sense otherwise…). At the same time, the story worked hard on being very dramatic to the point of making me roll my eyes from time to time: “… I prayed that if he managed to reach the Duke, that he’d fail in his quest. Because if Angoulême was killed, Roland would be free to do what he wanted. And all the world would burn.” – dun, dun, dun!

Eh. Now to the fun part! :)

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Spoilers, ahoy!

The ending. The ending, people! What happened there? Okay, so it might be that I have a problem with it because I’m not a believer in all things spiritual – I don’t believe in an afterlife. I don’t think my soul will pass into another, more beautiful place where it will spend the rest of the eternity. So if you’ve read this book, you’ll understand why the ending left me cold.

The last part of the book was very unusual in itself. I’m apparently pre-conditioned to expect a happily ever after for the teenage pair, which is weird because I always complain about this when I see it, but Tristan and Cécile got theirs – just, you know, after she died. And of course she had his child. Because why else would a seventeen-year-old want to survive the departure of her teenage husband? I really thought we were past the “boy leaves girl, girl becomes catatonic” stage (what with a whole decade passing since Twilight), but apparently not. Ugh.

And really, I have to say this again: the senseless slaughter? So unnecessary. Humans were just troll playthings here. Even Cécile, who is human, was given special powers in order to be able to compete on this supernatural battlefield. Why are you hating on humans? 

Oooohhh and one more thing (I’ll stop after this, I promise): Roland’s madness. How convenient that Cécile was able to cure his “defect” by removing iron (a poison) from his body, huh? The only character with a seriously warped personality in this book gets “cured” by a teenage witch who pulls the “corruption” out of him. Ah, simplistic resolutions. 

No, wait, one more: I still don’t like Cécile’s singing. It’s like every time she gets stuck and doesn’t know what to do, she sings her heart out and it magically solves everything. I’m not a huge fan of musicals – and I think that if this was ever made into a movie, I’d be fast-forwarding the songs because come on. Okay, so I know music can be therapeutic and I like music – I just fail to see how it can be helpful on the battlefield if you get what I mean.

End of spoilers.

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As you can see, this hit all the wrong buttons for me. I’m sad, I’m always sad when I dislike a series that showed so much promise at the beginning. But not everyone shares my opinion: check out Jolien’s glowing review if you want some balance.

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Have you read this series? What did you think?

Do trolls seem appealing to you? Or are you more particular with your choice of supernatural love interests?

I’d love to hear from you! :)

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Love in the Time of Scandal by Caroline Linden

love-time-scandal-caroline-lindenLove in the Time of Scandal (Scandal #3) by Caroline Linden, published on April 28, 2015 by Avon.

Goodreads. Author. Amazon. Book Depository. Barnes & Noble.

Source: publisher via Edelweiss (thank you, Avon, for providing me with an e-copy of this novel in exchange for an honest review).

Genre: historical romance.

Penelope Weston does not like Benedict Lennox, Lord Atherton. He may be the suave and charming heir to an earl, as well as the most handsome man on earth, but she can’t forget how he abandoned a friend in need—nor how he once courted her sister, Abigail. He’s the last man she would ever marry. If only she didn’t feel so attracted to the arrogant scoundrel… 

Once upon a time, Benedict thought he and Penelope got along rather well. Though he needs a wealthy bride to escape his cruel father’s control, spirited Penelope just doesn’t suit his plans for a model marriage—until a good deed goes awry, and scandalous rumors link his name to Penelope’s. She might not be the quiet, sensible wife he thought he wanted, but she is beautiful . . . beguiling . . . and far more passionate than he ever imagined. Can a marriage begun in scandal become a love match, too? (Goodreads)

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My rating: 2/5.

Ugh. So this wasn’t my favourite historical romance… I haven’t read the first two parts of the series but that’s not a problem (it usually isn’t with historicals, but I thought I’d mention it all the same). 

Anyway, here we have Penelope, who’s a non-noble heiress during her third or fourth season, and she’s actually a very sensible, likeable heroine – and the only reason this book didn’t get a 1/5 rating from me. Her young friend, currently courted by Benedict, asks her for advice on her match with the guy and as a result, she rejects his marriage proposal quite dramatically.

At the same ball, Penelope follows another friend, saves her from a difficult situation, nearly gets raped, and is saved by Benedict (whom she dislikes because he once courted her sister but she actually finds him really attractive). This situation gets difficult because rumours start about her being a promiscuous young lady, which is very untrue, but the society isn’t kind to women.

And here we come to the main problem of this story: Benedict chooses to do nothing at all to defend Penelope’s honor, but leaves her to confront the rumours on her own, until the situation becomes so difficult for her that she’s forced to marry him or leave society in shame. His reasoning is that they’re well suited, and he needs her dowry to free himself from the influence of his tyrannical, abusive, sadistic father.

In my eyes, this is an insufficient reason to enable slut-shaming (in a case, no less, where the woman is entirely innocent), especially since Benedict is a grown man and a child no longer and the only reason he needs her money is that it’s unseemly for a nobleman to earn money in any way but by inheriting it or something.

While their relationship grows and they eventually fall in love, I felt that the foundation of their marriage was false. I know that historical romances feature all manner of marriages where love grows in difficult circumstances, but here the heroine was in a bad situation partly because of the hero’s actions and he did nothing to help her, which is simply inexcusable in my opinion. What hero would do that?

Well, there’s a Grand Gesture he does towards the end that could perhaps save his honor, but I’m not a huge fan of those. For me, it’s the little things that count, and Benedict is, sadly, not my kind of guy.

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Have you read Love in the Time of Scandal? What did you think?

Could you sympathise with a hero who didn’t defend the heroine?

I’d love to hear your thoughts! :)

Mini Reviews #2: The NA Edition

Sooo, I’ve been on a new adult romance bender the last month or so (with some adult contemporary romances thrown in to shake things up a little o_O). This is a desperate attempt to make sense of the mounting pile of books to review – and I don’t really want to do a separate review for each one of these. These are not my favourite novels. I do like the new adult genre, it’s just that these weren’t a good fit for me. I’ll be honest with you: the “buy now with one click” feature on Amazon and the Kindle deals will be the death of me (or my bank account). You can check out my first batch of mini reviews here.

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return-armentroutThe Return (Titan #1) by Jennifer L. Armentrout, published in February 2015 by Spencer Hill Press. Goodreads. Author.

Source: purchased (e-book).

My rating: 3/5.

My mini opinion: I’m a big fan of JLA, especially her paranormal romances (both YA and NA), but this one fell short of my expectations. I really wanted to love it, but I guess I’d be more inclined to like Seth if I’d read the Covenant series, because this is a spin-off (but The Return can be read as a standalone). In any case, shit hits the fan when Titans are released from Tartarus and Seth has to protect Josie, one of the few demigods left alive (she’s Apollo’s daughter). I expected something along the lines of Wicked, where Ivy is a kick-ass heroine, but JLA fell into the helpless virgin + manwhore macho trap again, so I couldn’t really connect (it’s also less hot). It was a fast-paced read and I’ll probably read the sequel out of pure curiosity!

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rush-me-allison-parrRush Me, Running Back, and Imaginary Lines (New York Leopards #1, 2, and 3) by Allison Parr, published by Carina Press. Goodreads (1 2 3). Author.

Source: purchased (e-book) – all three.

My rating2.5/5 (for all three of them).

My mini opinion: Damn, I have no idea what possessed me to read not only one, but three books about American football players when I don’t know anything about the sport apart from the fact that the ball looks funny (seriously, this is not a popular sport here. Hockey ftw.). Anyway, the romance is passable, the football references vague enough that they’re bearable, and the banter is cool. Not my favourite series in the world but it was cheap for Kindle and I needed some fluff (which I got).

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boomerang-noelle-augustBoomerang (Boomerang #1) by Noelle August, published in 2014 by William Morrow Paperbacks. Goodreads. Authors.

Source: puchased (e-book).

My rating: 3/5.

My mini opinion: This was probably the best of the batch apart from The Return. It’s full of banter and bad decisions, and features a girl (Mia) who actually goes after her career and doesn’t slut-shame, so YAY for that (but she’s a bit privileged and spoiled, so that’s a downer). Ethan is adorable and scruffy, and I liked him quite a lot. The main problem for me was the ubiquitous lack of communication between the parties involved: talk to each other, people!!! Talking would have saved them from all the angst. But then the book would have about 15 pages, so there’s that.

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frigid-j-lynnFrigid (Frigid #1) by J. Lynn (Jennifer L. Armentrout), published in 2013 by Spencer Hill Conteporary. Goodreads. Author.

Source: purchased (e-book).

My rating: 2.5/5.

My mini opinion: Ahhhh WHYYYY, WHYYYY do we need another manslut/virgin book? Gah. These two get snowed into a beautiful ski chalet alone (because their friends get snowed in elsewhere…) and she loses her virginity to him (he’s her best friend but of course they’ve been secretly in love with each other FOREVER and he felt she was too good for him and she felt she wasn’t pretty enough) while a couple of mountain redneck psychos try to kill them because he’d slept with one girl too many. Eh. The sequel, Scorched, is coming out in a few months and I’ll probably cave and read it anyway because it seems that JLA is my crack.

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inspire-carmackInspire (The Muse #1) by Cora Carmack, published in 2014. Goodreads. Author.

Source: purchased (e-book).

My rating: 1.5/5.

My mini opinion: Apparently, Greek mythology is all the rage this days? I admit, I fell for the pretty cover (it’s been known to happen to me – I’m starting to suspect that my love for the cover is inversely proportional to my love for the story – all those horrible fantasy covers are proof to this theory). So this book is terrible (but go here for a 5-star review; I’m not sure we read the same text though). The unhealthy behaviour displayed by the two protagonists, the instalove (This is an actual quote: “I’m terrified. I can’t lose him. We’ve only known each other a month, and have been seeing each other officially for a little over a week, but he’s already imprinted on my heart.“), the obsessiveness, the clinginess… And THE ENDING of this thing is… I have no words to describe it beyond the fact that I groaned and wanted to throw my poor Kindle across the room.

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Untitled-2When Joss Met Matt by Ellie Cahill (Liz Czukas), published in February 2015 by Ballantine Books. Goodreads. Author.

Source: purchased (e-book).

My rating: 2/5.

My mini opinion: Eh. Why do I even bother. Here we have a situation where two virtual strangers (Joss and Matt) decide to have “sorbet sex”, which is a palate cleanser after a bad breakup, so they make good new memories. While this might be a good practice for a month or so, seven years signals a problem to me – they actually start relationships with other people so they can break them off and jump each other afterwards. I wanted to write a full review on this one and vent a little, but it’s really not worth it. I wanted fun and fluff, and rainbows, but I was disappointed. Go here for a 4/5 review of this book and here for a 1.5/5 one (this one is great!).

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WHEW! Now this is done and I can make peace with my impulsive, unnecessary e-book purchases. The writing of this post was very therapeutic for me…

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Have you read any of these NA titles? What did you think? 

Do you have any good NA recommendations for me? 

Come, let’s discuss and rant together! :)